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Introduction
LTPD Pathway
Functional Screening
Anatomical Adaptation
Game Demands
Conditioning for Rugby
Periodisation in Rugby
Content
Questions

Periodisation

Monitoring workloads

A simple yet effective method of monitoring the workload of Rugby players is to use a Rate of Perceived Exertion scale. This is a 20 point scale which measures the effort or intensity that the player subjectively rates (Foster et al, 2001). Each player rates the effort of intensity of the training session (gym-based) or field conditioning session or practice session between 20 and 30 minutes after the session. This is then recorded. The Rate of Perceived Exertion is then multiplied by the duration of the session. In our example in Table 10, the player rated the session as a ‘12’ which is in between ‘Fairly Light’ and ‘Somewhat Hard’. The duration of the session was 60 minutes, thus the total workload is estimated to be 720 units of work (Table 10).

Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale
Rating Descriptor

6

7

Very, very light

8

9

Very light

10

11

Fairly light

12

13

Somewhat hard

14

15

Hard

16

17

Very hard

18

19

Very, very hard

20

Player identifies intensity 20-30 minutes after unit+
Education of all involved required if system is to be useful
Time x PRE = Training load
60 minutes x RPE of 12 = 720 load
('TRIMP')
Table 10: Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale (adapted from Foster et al 2001, Kelly and Coutts 2007)

After a period of time recording these scores, the Strength and Conditioning coach is capable of rating the intensity of the session and there is good agreement between the workload as determined by players and that determined by experienced Strength and Conditioning coaches (Hennessy, 2011).