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Introduction
LTPD Pathway
Functional Screening
Anatomical Adaptation
Game Demands
Conditioning for Rugby
Periodisation in Rugby
Content
Questions

The Overhead Squat test

What are the common compensations during the Overhead Squat?

The common compensations noted in Rugby players following a simple Overhead Squat screen include:

From a frontal view position, we note the following:

  1. Knees move inwards.
  2. Feet rotate outwards.

From a side view position, we note the following:

  1. Heels may rise as the player descends into a squat position.
  2. Player fails to achieve a lower than thigh parallel squat depth.
  3. The torso falls forward of the base of support.

At this level, we suggest the coach uses a simple observation scoring sheet such as the one shown below in Table 3.

Date:
View:
Answer: Yes / No
('Yes' means satisfactory performance;
'No' means unsatisfactory performance)
Name of subject Feet Knees Arms Torso Hip/Thigh Heels

Joe Bloggs

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

John Doe

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Table 3: Scoring sheet for Overhead Squat. Note - Joe Bloggs achieves satisfactory performance; John Doe does not achieve a satisfactory performance for feet, knees and hip/thigh

This is the first step in becoming competent at observing of the Overhead Squat. Once you have become competent at screening a player, the next stage is to plan an appropriate training or ‘Anatomical Adaptation’ programme (Bompa, 2000). Ideally, the Anatomical Adaptation programme will address the common compensations noted in the Overhead Squat screen.

To assist you in planning an Anatomical Adaption programme, we present a list of appropriate exercises that may be useful in addressing the compensations noted. These exercises can become part of the player’s own individualised warm-up routine or home exercises. In addition, some of these can be incorporated into the team or squad programme such as the circuit training routine that we describe during Anatomical Adaptation.